Tagged with women

Goffman (1976) Gender Advertisements


Though gender is a social – not biological – construct, the depictions in consumer culture serve the ideological function of naturalizing specific qualities of femininity and masculinity. Advertising employs highly selective representations of cultural groups that downplay similarities and highlight differences. In the case of gender, Goffman (1976) studies the gender displays in advertisements and … Continue reading

Thiel-Stern, Shayla (2014) From the Dance Hall to Facebook

Thiel-Stern, Shayla (2014) From the Dance Hall to Facebook


ARGUMENT Society punishes girls who don’t properly perform femininity based on dominant cultural ideologies and expectations. Thiel-Stern’s research highlights the particular threat posed by teen girls who emerge from the “safety” of the domestic space to partake in public leisure. Whether drinking in public dance halls, screaming at an Elvis concert, or posting selfies to … Continue reading

Garvey, Ellen Gruber. (1996) The Adman in the Parlor

Garvey, Ellen Gruber. (1996) The Adman in the Parlor


ARGUMENT In the 1880s, advertising became a part of daily life and it socialized women and children (mostly girls) into adopting the new consumer culture. SUMMARY In The Adman in the Parlour, Garvey (1996) examines socio-cultural changes in the late nineteenth century to better understand the origins of women’s consumer culture. While most historians point … Continue reading

Formanek-Brunell, Miriam. (1992) “Sugar and Spite: The Politics of Doll Play in Nineteenth Century America”


ARGUMENT The author challenges the popular understanding that dolls limited girls’ development and restricted them to domestic and maternal responsibilities. Her studies of girls’ diaries, magazines, advice manuals and other primary sources finds that girls appropriated dolls and used them for purposes other than practicing their mothering skills. SUMMARY In the earlier part of the … Continue reading

Lasch, Christopher. (1978) The Culture of Narcissism


Our culture has become so fiercely individualistic that we are obsessed with ourselves and gratifying our id.  We are in a constant quest for fulfillment, happiness and the respect and adoration of others. (22-23)  Advertising promotes self-doubt (not self-indulgence) so that needs are created and never satisfied (181). Chapter 4 – The Propaganda of Commodities … Continue reading