Tagged with media history

Creeber and Martin (2009) Digital Cultures


Link to Text >> Ch 1. Digital Theories Argument – Creeber and Martin 2009 trace the history of Critical Media Studies as a precursor to the study of digital media.  They situate New Media studies within post-structuralist theories of media that emphasize multiple layers of meaning that are actively produced by users.  There is no … Continue reading

Englehardt, Tom. (1986) “The Shortcake Strategy”


ARGUMENT – After the deregulation of children’s advertising in the early 1980s, Children’s television shows were no longer designed to entertain, but to generate sales. Authorship shifted from TV studios to toy companies and advertising agencies that produced shows to function as program length commercials (PLCs) for licensed characters and their associated merchandising. Under this … Continue reading

Meyers, Cynthia (2014) A Word From Our Sponsor

Meyers, Cynthia (2014) A Word From Our Sponsor


ARGUMENT Meyers argues that advertising agencies played a key role in carving out American radio as a commercial medium and positioned themselves at the controls.  The primary reason their role has gone unnoticed is due to the fact that they were never credited on air so as not to distract from the advertiser’s message. SUMMARY … Continue reading

Thiel-Stern, Shayla (2014) From the Dance Hall to Facebook

Thiel-Stern, Shayla (2014) From the Dance Hall to Facebook


ARGUMENT Society punishes girls who don’t properly perform femininity based on dominant cultural ideologies and expectations. Thiel-Stern’s research highlights the particular threat posed by teen girls who emerge from the “safety” of the domestic space to partake in public leisure. Whether drinking in public dance halls, screaming at an Elvis concert, or posting selfies to … Continue reading

Smith, Jacob. (2010) “The Books that Sing”


ARGUMENT Scholars generally consider children to be secondary “bit players” within consumer culture until the advent of television (Schor 2005).  Smith’s case study of children’s phonographs in the 1890-1930 period demonstrates that phonograph producers were “quick to recognize the importance of the child audience” (93). SUMMARY Children were approached indirectly (through parents/mothers) and directly in … Continue reading

Garvey, Ellen Gruber. (1996) The Adman in the Parlor

Garvey, Ellen Gruber. (1996) The Adman in the Parlor


ARGUMENT In the 1880s, advertising became a part of daily life and it socialized women and children (mostly girls) into adopting the new consumer culture. SUMMARY In The Adman in the Parlour, Garvey (1996) examines socio-cultural changes in the late nineteenth century to better understand the origins of women’s consumer culture. While most historians point … Continue reading

Nasaw, David. (1992) Children and Commerical Culture: Moving Pictures in the Early 20th Century


ARGUMENT A study of Nickelodeon movies in the early 20th century demonstrates that children had independence, agency and collective buying power as early as 1910. SUMMARY Nasaw argues that although reformers and child protectors campaigned to keep children out of the Nickelodeon theatres, children continued to swarm to the theatres in search of cheap excitement … Continue reading